Don’t Back Down

phone technician, fix phone, cellphone, iphone, smartphone, phone, office phone, phone companies, phone techsAs you know, we have been having problems with our phone and internet.  We finally, thank G-d, got someone to help us fix the problem.  Hopefully, this will be the end of the phone/internet trouble saga.

It is fixed.  Mostly.  It is still cutting out, and still turning off intermittently.  There is one more little section of wire that has to be fixed, and hopefully, it will be fixed on Sunday.  Please G-d, we will not have any more problems like this, nor any worse.  Honestly, as harrowing and stressful as these past few months of phone troubles have been, even though it has cost us stress and a bit of money, it could have been worse.  There are much, much worse problems to have than these.  I pray that the stress that we went through with our phone line filled our quota, and that we won’t have to worry about worse things.  Because, in the long run, phones are phones, and health, life, day-to-day finances, and family are all much more important.

But why the title of this post?  Because of this:

When I went to set up the tech appointment with the secretary, she put the two technicians on the line, with each other.  After a few minutes, she put it on speaker.  It was hilarious.  You could hear the two technicians yelling at each other, arguing, blaming, and somehow having a decent discussion.

It reminded me of the street we lived on before we moved on campus.  It was a two-way street that could only fit one car down the middle.  Actually, it could fit two or three, but one side of the street was legal parking, and the other side was used as parking illegally, and no one cared.  So, it could usually only fit one car at a time.  There were sections where two cars could pass, but they were few and far between.

When two cars going in opposite directions would meet, the drivers would honk at each other.  Obviously, no one moved, because in Israel, you are not allowed to be  a “fryer” (a weakling).  Then they would start yelling at each other, each threatening to call the police.  They got out of their cars, screamed at each other, and called the cops.  In the meantime, traffic piled up behind them.  Eventually, before the police came, and often before they were called, one of the drivers would decide that he needed to get to his destination, and would allow the other driver to pass.  Mind you, if these drivers had met anywhere else, they would have been friends.  And if they meet in the grocery store, after the incident, they will still be friends.  But, you are not allowed to back down.

This is what the technicians’ phone conversation reminded me of.  When the tech guys came, they worked together for over an hour and a half.  Really, why should they fight?  They’re both phone technicians, working on a job and getting paid for it; they’re working together, in the cold, for the same reason.  Neither felt the responsibility was his, but both are working on it, and so each can take comfort in the fact that he’s not working alone.  As a matter of fact, the first tech to come called the other guy, who was late, and say, “Brother (achi), what’s up?  Where are you?”  Then, when he found out that there was a delay, he got upset and asked why he wasn’t informed earlier.  But he took the conversation outside, because it’s not nice to scream at someone in front of other people.  And when he came back in, he wasn’t angry at all.

Israelis don’t back down.  There’s a tough love.  We’re brothers.  Sure, you fight with your brother.  But at the end of the day, he’s your brother, and you love him, and will help him no matter what.  So, Israelis don’t back down.  So what?

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2 thoughts on “Don’t Back Down

  1. I heard a joke about two drivers heading toward each other on a road like you described. Eventually they can’t go any farther and stop. One says, “I don’t back up for idiots.” The other says, “No problem, I do”, and backs up.

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